Biomedical Engineer

Biomedical Engineers are innovating and developing technology solutions for the medical field. Their key aim is to enhance the quality and efficiency of patient care by developing medical devices, resources and applications for the operation of biomedical equipment that improves the quality of life and the functioning of the medical industry.

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KEY SKILLS

  • Math and Science Skills

  • Research Skills

  • Technological Skills

  • Communication skills

  • Design, develop, and test all aspects of medical/surgical components, equipment, and instruments.

  • Work with cross-functional teams to test prototypes.

  • Analyze failure, corrective and preventive action to respond to customer complaints.

  • Perform independent research.

  • Install, adjust, maintain, repair, or provide technical support for biomedical equipment.

  • Report research findings through scientific publication, oral presentation, and formal documents with regard to industry contracts and funded grant proposals.

  • Demonstrate and explain correct operation of equipment to medical personnel

PROS

  • Much faster than average job growth 

  • Higher-than-average salary 

  • Various settings from which to choose (hospitals, universities, research facilities)

  • Jobs available in various industries (manufacturing, educational, medical)

  • Several specializations to choose from (biomaterials, biomechanics, bioinstrumentation)

CONS

  • Additional hours of work may sometimes be necessary

  • A graduate degree is typically required for advancement

  • Small field means the large employment increase translates into a relatively small number of absolute jobs

  • Potential hazardous exposure to noxious fumes, communicable diseases and radiation

OPPORTUNITY TYPES

GOT WHAT IT TAKES?

  • Government

  • Companies

  • Interest in biomedical field

  • has technological knowledge

KEY OPPORTUNITIES

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Interesting Facts about the career

  • Biomedical engineering is a small field, with only 15,700 workers, according to 2010 data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). It is the third fastest-growing career, however, in the country – following personal care aides and home health aides. And it is the fastest growing occupation that requires a degree. To put this in perspective, BLS projects the average U.S. occupation to grow by 14 percent through 2020, while demand for biomedical engineers is predicted to increase by 62 percent. That is more than quadruple the national average.

  • Biomedical engineers earned a median annual salary of $85,620 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, biomedical engineers earned a 25th percentile salary of $65,700, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $107,850, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 21,300 people were employed in the U.S. as biomedical engineers.

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