Food Writers and Editors

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KEY SKILLS

  • Writing

  • Editing

  • Aesthetics

  • Quirky

  • Language

  • Descriptive

  • Creative 

  • Communication

  • Cultural Awareness

  • Appreciation for foreign cuisines

PROS

  • You can taste the world up a bit closer

  • You get to eat various cuisines from all over the world

  • You are constantly learning about food

  • You get to attend a lot of food festivals

CONS

  • No industrial standards

  • It may not always go according to your plan

  • It can be a lonely profession

  • You might have to deal with an inconsistent cash flow

  • It can get expensive if you are starting out as a freelancer

OPPORTUNITY TYPES

GOT WHAT IT TAKES?

  • Companies

  • Freelancer 

  • Agencies

  • Magazines

  • Newspapers 

  • Blogging 

  • You love food and writing about it

  • You can read numerous articles about food and restaurants

  • You know all the restaurants around you

  • You look forward to attending food festivals

  • You have an understanding of content management systems or cooking skills

KEY OPPORTUNITIES

Books

Podcasts

Networking Groups

Interesting Facts about the career

  • Common Misconceptions About Food Editors

1. Not all food editors are restaurant critics. 

2. We don't always love new restaurants sometimes we love to go to old restaurants. 

3. We're food editors because we love food so we're definitely not picky.

 4. We definitely do not always want to choose restaurants. We want to visit other people's favorites or suggestions. We don't always know best (although sometimes we do!). 

5. Please don't be nervous about cooking for us. Just as we'd love you to pick the restaurant, we'd love for you to cook for us.

 6. Just as we don't judge your cooking, we don't judge your food order when we're out to eat together. Bone marrow is not for everyone, and if you don't want to eat it, we do not fault you.

7. Some of us might watch food TV, but others of us don't. Some of us even hate it. 

8. While we're no stranger to the occasional food Instagram shot, we're not pulling out the smartphone every time we sit down to a meal or cook up something at home.


Myths about being a Food Writer

1. You get to eat all day. Food writers spend most of our time reading, researching, planning, interviewing sources, driving, note-taking, transcribing, following up -- and most of that before the actual writing begins. Eating is only one part of the job, and rarely the biggest.    

2.  You get to visit all the hot and trendy restaurants, then critique them. Many food writers rarely write about restaurants. Criticism is only one aspect of food writing and requires a highly sharpened skill set.  3.  You get a big pile of free stuff everywhere you go. 

4. You get access to the tastiest, best quality food everywhere you go. Intrepid food writer Anthony Bourdain has told some colorful stories of experiences that will turn your stomach.  

5. You get treated like a rock star when you go to a restaurant. Famed food writer Ruth Reichl wore disguises to protect her anonymity. Since publicity can make or break a place, when staff learns there are media in the house, they are just pretending to be the best.


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